State Resource Links will gradually be broken apart into pages by type/topic.

For now, state pages will contain preliminary lists, as applicable.  Please feel free to contribute via comments or contact forms with relevant links and resources.

Patient Resources

Lymedisease.org ~ Find Your State Group

Join with others in your own state to bring change through education, advocacy and activism. Share with people who will understand your story. Ask for help, find a doctor, tell people about events.

Local Support Groups

  • Help us get in touch with your group leader and/or list your group or a group contact
  • Consider starting a local group.  If you need help with this, perhaps we can assist, such as:
    • helping you find other patients in your area;
    • helping you find your next-nearest neighbor groups for networking;
    • brainstorming ways to connect where geography precludes in-person meetings.

Some of our states may have very few to no existing support groups, though you also could have a fellow Lyme patient less than a mile away, in the very next town, at your child’s school, or across town that you don’t know about yet (all of the above were the case for me).

Please feel free to share any of the following via comments, the contact form below, or vie northernrockieslyme@gmail.com

  • Interests/talents/skills or just that you’d like to get involved;
  • Relevant or interesting links for your state;
  • Organizations either in your state or involved in your state;
  • Events in your state (past, present, future);
  • Lyme or tick research, data, survey, or detection efforts (Lyme and/or ticks).

 

Lyme/Tick Distribution

UND scientists identify Lyme disease in Grand Forks 

Dakota Student (UND)

Scientists at UND warn that all the variables for contracting Lyme disease are now present and established in Grand Forks County. Although North Dakota borders Minnesota counties, where the risk of contracting the tick-borne Lyme disease is moderate to high based on confirmed human cases, few studies have been done on the migration of the disease farther west. – See more at: http://dakotastudent.com/5538/news/und-scientists-identify-lyme-disease-in-grand-forks/#sthash.nbPSoafp.dpuf

Deer Ticks Confirmed in North Dakota Carry Lyme Disease and Important Implications for ‘Non-Lyme’ States

Invisibly Lyme Montana (blog article)

Recent findings published in the Journal of Medical Entomology carry critically important implications for Lyme Disease detection in Montana and other states currently not considered Lyme endemic.

Although North Dakota was considered to be outside the range of deer ticks (Ixodes scapularis),researchers sampled nine locations in North Dakota and found deer ticks present at six of them, including ticks infected with Lyme spirochetes (Borrelia burdorferi), Anaplasmosis, and Babesia.

Survey of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and Tick-Borne Pathogens in North Dakota

Journal of Medical Entomology

ABSTRACT

Ticks were sampled at nine locations throughout North Dakota during early summer of 2010, using flagging techniques and small mammals trapping. In total, 1,762 ticks were collected from eight of the nine locations. The dominant species were Dermacentor variabilis (Say) (82%), found throughout the state, and Ixodes scapularis Say (17%), found in northeastern counties. A few nymphal and adultI. scapularis tested positive for Borrelia burgdorferi (3%) and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (8%). This is the first report of I. scapularis and associated pathogens occurring in North Dakota and provides evidence for continued westward expansion of this important vector tick species in the United States.

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